Thursday, April 7, 2016

Malay Road Toponyms 21

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Malay Road Toponyms 4
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Malay Road Toponyms 17
Malay Road Toponyms 18
Malay Road Toponyms 19
Malay Road Toponyms 20

Jalan Basong
   جالن باسوڠ

Jalan Basong is named after Ikan Basong, or black sharkminnow (Labeo chrysophekadion), aspecies of freshwater fish. Jalan Basong is located within Sembawang Straits Estate. The road is flanked by landed houses and first appeared on maps in 1970.

Jalan Cherpen
    جالن چيرڤين

Located within Sembawang Springs Estate, Jalan Cherpen first appeared on maps in 1963. Some of the roads within the estate seem to follow a theme of road names related to Malay literature. There was also a sister road named "Jalan Pantun" which has since been expunged. "Cherpen" or "cerpen" as it is currently spelled is a word to describe a short story.

Jalan Hikayat
     جالن حكاية

Located and flanked by the private landed houses of Sembawang Springs Estate, Jalan Hikayat appeared on maps in 1963. In Malay, hikayat refers to a legendary tale or account with historic significance. Some of the roads in the estate seem to follow a theme of names related to Malay literature.

Jalan Janggus
   جالن جڠڬوس

Named after the cashew tree (Anacardium occidentale), Jalan Jaggus is a minor road located within Sembawang Straits Estate and can be accessed from Sembawang Road. Janggus, can also describe the tree and cashew nut itself. Another Malay word for it is Gajus, and has a namesake road named after it off Haig Road.

Jalan Jeruju
  جالن جروجو

Jalan Jeruju is a minor road flanked with the houses of Sembawang Springs Estate. It first appeared on maps in 1963. Jeruju is the Malay name for a species of shrubby herb commonly known as sea holly or holly mangrove (Acanthus ebracteatus).

Jalan Kandis
  جالن كنديس

Located with Sembawang Straits Estate, near Sembawang Road, Jalan Kandis is a minor road linking the other sister roads of the estate. The road also spawned other minor lanes named Kandia Lane and Kandis Walk. The road first appeared on maps in 1969. Kandis is Malay for Garcinia, which is also commonly known as saptrees

Jalan Kerayong
     جالن كرايوڠ

Jalan Kerayong is named after a tree. Kerayung as it is currently spelled is scientifically known as Parkia javanica. In Indonesia, it is an important medicinal plant in the herb industry. Can be accessed off Sembawang Road, Jalan Kerayong is flanked by some houses of Sembawang Straits Estate. The road first appeared on maps in 1969.

Jalan Kemuning
      جالن كمونيڠ

Located within Sembawang Springs Estate, Jalan Kemuning first appeared on maps in 1958, much earlier that the other roads. Kemuning in Malay refers to Orange jessamine (Murraya paniculata), is a tropical, evergreen plant. Located off Sembawang Road and ending at Jalan Malu-Malu, Jalan Kemuning is surrounded by private houses.

Jalan Machang
      جالن ماچڠ

Located off Sembawang Road and ending at Jalan Kandis, Jalan Machang is a minor road surrounded by the houses of Sembawang Straits Estate. Machang or Bachang as it is currently known is Malay for Mangifera foetida or horse mango. The fruit when ripe is edible. Jalan Machang first appeared on maps in 1970.

Jalan Malu-Malu
     جالن مالو-مالو

This road, Jalan Malu-Malu, probably has dual meaning. The term, malu-malu, could be used to describe someone who is shy, or the plant, Mimosa pudica, known commonly as "Touch-me-not" or sleepy plant. First appearing on maps in 1963, the road is flanked by some shophouses and houses of Sembawang Springs Estate.

Jalan Saher
   جالن ساهر

Flanked by the private houses of Sembawang Gardens Estate, Jalan Shaer like some of the sister roads there first appeared on maps in 1963. "Shaer", in the older spelling of "syair" is translated to "poem" from Malay. Like some road within Sembawang Gardens, Jalan Shaer follows the theme of road names related to Malay literature.

Jalan Sankam
      جالن سنكم

Jalan Sankam is a minor road off Sembawang Road, located within and surrounded with landed housing of Sembawang Straits Estate. The road first appeared on maps in 1969. Jalan Santam is named after a plant currently spelled as "santam". It is scientifically known as Marsdenia tinctoria

Jalan Salang
    جالن سالڠ

Jalan Salang is a minor road located within Sembawang Gardens Estate and first appeared on maps in 1958. Flanked by landed housing, it starts from Jalan Jeruju from the north and ending at Jalan Hikayat in the south, In Malay, "salang" could mean a variety of things. A rattan basket to put food, a form of punishment that involves stabbing a person with a keris, a traditional Malay dagger and other varieties of plants.

Jalan Sajak
  جالن ساجق

Some of the roads in Sembawang Springs Estate seem to follow a theme of names related to Malay literature. Sajak, in Malay as a wide variety of meanings. but is said to mean "the same sounds in a poem, specially the ending of the word". It basically a term meaning to mean "rhyming as in Malay poems". Jalan Sajak is a minor road and first appeared on maps in 1963.

Jalan Sendudok
    جالن سندودوق

Jalan Sendudok is a minor crescent road flanked by the landed housing of Sembawang Springs Estate. First appeared on maps in 1963, the road is named after a type of shrub known as Melastoma. They're planted around the world for the aesthetic value of their bright purple flowers.

Jalan Serengam
     جالن سرڠام

Serengam literally describes "to eat with greed until finish" or "something that is thick or many" such as a full head of hair and an ant colony. Jalan Serengam is a dead end road off Jalan Jeruju located Sembawang Springs Estate. It first appeared on maps in 1963.

Jalan Telipok
    جالن تليڤوك

Jalan Telipok is a short minor lane located within Sembawang Springs Estate, off Jalan Malu-Malu and Jalan Kemuning. First appeared on maps in 1963, it is flanked by landed housing. Telipok is Malay for Nymphaea caerulea, commonly known as blue lotus, although the current Malay name for it is "bunga teratai biru".

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